Coalition Publishes 2017 Annual Report

In 2017, a year of transition for the Coalition, we welcomed new staff in key leadership positions. We also saw remarkable accomplishments at the Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV). LCADV trained over 1,000 professionals in the fields of advocacy, law enforcement, prosecution, social work, and child welfare. Our legislative efforts led to the passage of landmark bills expanding domestic violence protections to dating partners and same sex couples. We enhanced the work of several coordinated community response teams across the state, providing targeted training and technical assistance to our member programs and their local partners.

Download: Annual Report 2017 Final

Domestic Violence Advocates Applaud Passage of Bills Strengthening Firearm Prohibitions and Protective Orders

For Immediate Release: May 22, 2018
Contact: Mariah Wineski, (225) 752-1296

The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) applauded last week’s final passage of several bills expanding domestic violence protections in Louisiana. SB 231 by Senator J.P. Morrell and HB 207 by Representative Larry Bagley are among the bills that cleared their final legislative hurdles in the last week of the 2018 regular legislative session, sending each to the Governor’s desk.

Download:Legislative Session 2018

ADVOCATES CONVENE AT CAPITOL TO SUPPORT ANTI-VIOLENCE LEGISLATION

For Immediate Release: May 7, 2018
Contact: Mariah Wineski, (225) 752-1296

Baton Rouge, LA – May 7, 2018 – Advocates from across Louisiana will gather at the State Capitol at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 9th, to encourage legislators to support laws designed to strengthen protections for domestic violence and sexual assault survivors.

This is the seventh annual Day at the Capitol, hosted by the Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) and the Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault (LaFASA). LCADV and LaFASA will have a display table in the Rotunda of the Louisiana State Capitol building from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Advocates and supporters will be speaking with legislators throughout the day to discuss domestic and sexual violence in Louisiana and how legislation can affect programs, advocates, and survivors.

The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) has been heavily involved in efforts to pass several bills expanding protections for victims of violence across Louisiana. That package of bills includes SB 231 by Senator J.P. Morrell (D-New Orleans), which creates a statewide process for transferring firearms from domestic violence offenders, and HB 207 by Representative Larry Bagley (R-Stonewall), which requires proof of service of protective orders to be transmitted to the Louisiana Protective Order Registry.

Advocates say this package of bills will lead to a reduction of domestic violence homicides in Louisiana. “We have made great strides in protecting domestic violence survivors in recent years,” said Mariah Wineski, LCADV Executive Director. “But the fact remains that Louisiana women are killed at a rate twice the national average. If we are serious about saving the lives of domestic violence survivors, we must prioritize the enforcement of firearm prohibitions and protection orders.”

On the evening of May 8th, the coalitions will host a joint legislative reception to honor champions and allies in the movement to end domestic violence and sexual assault. Several legislators, advocates, and organizations will be honored for their efforts. “We are proud of the efforts of Louisiana’s legislators in recent years to take a stand against domestic and sexual violence,” said Wineski. “We look forward to an evening of celebration to honor those champions and the many advocates across the state who work tirelessly to support survivors each day.”

For more information on these events, visit http://www.lcadv.org.

 # # #

The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) is a statewide network of programs, organizations, and individuals who share the goal of ending domestic violence in Louisiana. LCADV is dedicated to bringing about change in our institutions, laws, politics, attitudes, and beliefs which will allow individuals to live free of violence. For more information, visit www.lcadv.org.

Coalition Applauds Progress of Firearm Transfer Legislation

For Immediate Release: April 3, 2018
Media Contact: Mariah Wineski, (225) 752-1296
Baton Rouge, LA – On Tuesday, the Senate passed legislation creating a process for the transfer or relinquishment of firearms from domestic abusers. The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV), applauded the Senate’s passage of SB 231 by Senator J.P. Morrell, citing its potential to reduce domestic violence homicides in Louisiana.

According to research by the Washington, D.C. based Violence Policy Center, Louisiana ranks third in the nation for the rate of female victims killed by male offenders in single victim/single offender incidents. Advocates say this legislation could lead to reduced homicides by creating a mechanism for removing firearms from those already prohibited by law from possessing them. Mariah Wineski, executive director of LCADV, says the lack of an enforcement procedure thus far has resulted in easy firearm access for abusers. “State and federal law prohibit many abusers from possessing firearms. Currently, our state lacks any consistent process for actually implementing these prohibitions. This means many people convicted of domestic abuse battery – and therefore prohibited from possessing a firearm – nonetheless retain access to their guns.” This bill seeks to close that gap by requiring sheriffs to facilitate the sale, donation, or lawful transfer of firearms from convicted abusers and those subject to a protective order. In 2017, 73% of domestic violence homicides in Louisiana were committed with firearms.

Advocates have consistently expressed frustration with Louisiana’s high domestic homicide rate, and they are hopeful that this legislation will lead to a reduction in homicides by addressing the deadly combination of domestic violence and guns. Louisiana is not alone in pursuing firearm transfer procedures for domestic abusers. In 2017, the Law Enforcement Subcommittee of the Louisiana Domestic Violence Prevention Commission issued a report summarizing similar procedures in several other jurisdictions nationwide. That commission’s report recommended a legislative process to bridge the gap between laws that prohibit possession of firearms and laws that impose criminal penalties for prohibited possession of firearms, noting that “a properly implemented and executed program of firearm relinquishment will serve to dramatically reduce the number of murders of women in Louisiana.”

“This legislation bridges the gap between existing domestic violence laws and their meaningful implementation,” said Wineski. “At the end of the day, this is bill is about enforcing existing laws designed to protect the lives of domestic violence victims. We look forward to working with the legislature to secure the full passage of this lifesaving measure.” The bill now moves to the House of Representatives.

# # #

The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) is a statewide network of programs, organizations, and individuals who share the goal of ending domestic violence in Louisiana. LCADV empowers its members and communities through advocacy, education, resource development, and technical assistance. LCADV is dedicated to bringing about change in our institutions, laws, politics, attitudes, and beliefs which will allow individuals to live free of violence. For more information, visit www.lcadv.org.

Coalition Expresses Disappointment in Failure of Economic Stability and Pay Equity Bills

Download: Press Release

Baton Rouge, LA - On Tuesday, March 27th, the Louisiana Senate voted down three bills promoting pay equity, wage transparency, and a minimum wage increase. The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) is disappointed in the legislature’s rejection of these commonsense measures that would have improved the economic security of all Louisianans, and especially survivors of domestic violence.

LCADV is the statewide coalition of programs, organizations, and individuals working to end domestic violence in Louisiana. Our member programs provided services to over 17,000 domestic violence victims and their children in 2017. Our network of domestic violence programs provide survivors of domestic violence with comprehensive services to meet their needs, including but not limited to emergency shelter, advocacy, support services, children’s programming, and transitional housing. In addition to direct service provision, our coalition recognizes that domestic violence does not exist in a vacuum and cannot be eliminated in a vacuum. Efforts to end domestic violence must address both the short- and long-term needs of survivors. Survivors’ economic stability is central to our efforts to end domestic violence and promote lives free from abuse.

Public policy that makes it difficult to earn a fair wage, encourages pay secrecy, and dismisses the fundamental importance of pay equity is detrimental to survivors’ ability to maintain safety and stability. Limiting survivors’ access to financial resources restricts their ability to seek safety and provides barriers to their long-term stability and independence.

Pay equity, pay transparency, and a living wage benefit all families, but are especially crucial for families in crisis who rely on the wages of a single earner. There is no way around it: survivor safety is directly linked to survivor economic security. While we are disappointed in the failure of these commonsense measures, it is our sincere hope that the Louisiana legislature will renew its commitment to the wellbeing of domestic violence survivors for the remainder of this legislative session.

About LCADV

Our Mission: The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) is a statewide network of programs, organizations, and individuals who share the goal of ending domestic violence in Louisiana. LCADV empowers its members and communities through advocacy, education, resource development, and technical assistance.

Our Vision: LCADV is dedicated to bringing about change in our institutions, laws, politics, attitudes, and beliefs which will allow individuals to live free of violence. 

Notice of Federal Funds Availability

Notice is hereby given of the availability of federal funds through the Office of Violence Against Women (OVW), housed in the U.S. Department of Justice, OJP.
The Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement (LCLE) administers and allocates these funds through the Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence.
The total amount available to the domestic violence programs is $277,861.
If interested in this competitive opportunity:
Complete Notice of Funding Opportunity, application materials and instructions for
submitting proposals may be obtained from the LCLE website (www.lcle.la.gov).
For questions and additional information contact:

Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence
P.O. Box 77308
Baton Rouge, LA 70879
info@lcadv.org
The deadline for submitting is: February 7, 2018.
Proposals will be considered for approval at the March meeting.
Representatives of agencies under consideration will be required to attend this meeting in order to receive funding.

January is National Stalking Awareness Month

January is National Stalking Awareness Month, National Stalking Awareness Month challenges the nation to fight this dangerous and potentially lethal crime by learning more about it.

What is stalking? According to Louisiana RS 14:40.2, Stalking is the intentional and repeated following or harassing of another person that would cause a reasonable person to feel alarmed or to suffer emotional distress.

Statistics

  • Each year 7.5 million people are stalked in the United States.
  • 76% of intimate partner femicide victims have been stalked by their intimate partner.
  • 89% of femicide victims who had been physically assaulted had also been stalked in the 12 months before their murder.
  • 54% of femicide victims reported stalking to police before they were killed by their stalkers.
  • 1 in 8 employed stalking victims lose time from work as a result of their victimization and more than half lose 5 days of work or more.
  •  1 in 7 stalking victims move as a result of their victimization.

If you are experiencing stalking or need help developing a safety plan you can call the Louisiana Statewide Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-888-411-1333 or visit http://lcadv.org/member-programs/. 

Statistics Source: Stalking Resource Center

stalking-4

 

 

LCADV to Compete in Purple Purse Challenge, Focused on Financial Abuse

Baton Rouge, LA – The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) is the only Louisiana nonprofit selected to join domestic violence organizations across the country competing in The Allstate Foundation’s Purple Purse Challenge, which launches on Monday. The Challenge is a public fundraising and awareness campaign that coincides with October’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The Challenge features charities that work to ensure economic empowerment for domestic violence survivors. This is LCADV’s second year competing in the Challenge.

“LCADV’s statewide economic empowerment efforts include everything from public policy initiatives to matching savings programs for domestic violence survivors,” said Mariah Wineski, Executive Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence. “We are excited for the opportunity to compete in The Allstate Foundation Purple Purse Challenge. Every domestic violence survivor deserves the economic resources necessary to live in safety. With the public’s help in this Challenge, we can move closer to that goal.”

One-hundred percent of proceeds raised by LCADV in this challenge will go toward life-changing financial empowerment services to help domestic violence survivors build safer lives for themselves and their families. In order to count toward an organization’s total, donations must be received by Oct. 31 at 1:00 p.m. CST, and must be received through the Crowdrise-hosted page found at www.lcadv.org/purplepurse.

To further boost their fundraising efforts, LCADV will raffle an extremely limited edition purple purse designed by tennis champion and Purple Purse ambassador, Serena Williams. Each donation of $100 made in support of LCADV throughout the Challenge will qualify for one entry to win this exclusive tote, handcrafted from premium Italian leather.

The Allstate Foundation Purple Purse Challenge is administered by CrowdRise and is part of Allstate Foundation Purple Purse, a public education and fundraising program aimed at raising awareness of the prevalence of domestic violence and financial abuse and the need for resources to help survivors. Now in its 13th year, Allstate Foundation Purple Purse has propelled more than 1 million survivors on the path to safety and security, and invested more than $55 million to empower women to break free from abuse through life-changing financial education, job training and readiness and small business programs for survivors.

To help LCADV win The Allstate Foundation Purple Purse Challenge, head to www.lcadv.org/purplepurse. There are many ways to help: you can make a contribution, create your own fundraising page, or share the Challenge page with others.

###

ABOUT LOUISIANA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) is a statewide network of programs, organizations, and individuals who share the goal of ending domestic violence in Louisiana. LCADV empowers its members and communities through advocacy, education, resource development, and technical assistance.
LCADV is dedicated to bringing about change in our institutions, laws, politics, attitudes, and beliefs which will allow individuals to live free of violence. For more information, visit www.lcadv.org.

ABOUT THE ALLSTATE FOUNDATION
Established in 1952, The Allstate Foundation is an independent, charitable organization made possible by subsidiaries of The Allstate Corporation (NYSE: ALL). Through partnerships with nonprofit organization across the country, The Allstate Foundation brings the relationships, reputation and resources of Allstate to support innovative and lasting solutions that enhance people’s well-being and prosperity. With a focus on building financial independence for domestic violence survivors, empowering youth and celebrating the charitable community involvement of Allstate agency owners and employees, The Allstate Foundation works to bring out the good in people’s lives. For more information, visit www.AllstateFoundation.org.

Louisiana Remains Among Deadliest States for Women

Baton Rouge, LA – The Washington, D.C. based Violence Policy Center has issued its annual report on female murder victims, and it once again paints a grim picture for Louisiana. The report, When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of Homicide Data, reviews female victims killed by male offenders in single victim/single offender incidents and ranks all states from highest rates to lowest. The 2017 report, which analyzed homicides committed in 2015, was released this week. Louisiana ranks 3rd in the nation, down from 2nd the year before.

The report reveals that nationwide more than 1,680 women were murdered by men in 2015, and the most common weapon used was a gun. 93% of women killed by men were murdered by someone they knew. The report also shows that black women were disproportionately victimized, with black females being murdered by males at a rate more than twice as high as white females: 2.43 per 100,000 versus 0.96 per 100,000. The report does not count multiple death incidents or incidents where the perpetrator and victim are the same gender.

This is the 20th year that the Violence Policy Center has published When Men Murder Women. From 1996 to 2015, the rate of women murdered by men in single victim/single offender incidents nationwide dropped from 1.57 per 100,000 women in 1996 to 1.12 per 100,000 women in 2015, a decrease of 29%. However, a review of the report reveals that Louisiana has failed to make the progress seen in the rest of the nation. The rate in Louisiana remains 2.22 per 100,000, double the national average, and 41% higher than the national average was 20 years ago when the reporting began.

Mariah Wineski, executive director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence, says there are a number of factors that contribute to Louisiana’s high homicide rate. One factor is inadequate funding for victim services. “Domestic violence programs across the state are stretched dangerously thin. Without additional resources, there simply are not enough shelter beds to meet the needs of victims seeking immediate safety.” Another factor, Wineski says, is easy firearm access for abusers. “Although state and federal law prohibit many abusers from possessing firearms, our state lacks any consistent process for actually implementing these prohibitions. This means many people convicted of domestic abuse battery – and therefore prohibited from possessing a firearm – nonetheless retain access to their guns.” Of the women killed by men in Louisiana in 2015, 64% were killed with guns.

Though they expressed frustration with the state’s ranking, advocates are hopeful that change is possible. “This report should be a wake-up call for Louisiana policymakers,” Wineski said. “We are facing a homicide rate of epidemic proportions.” The report shows that the rate of women murdered by men in Louisiana has increased steadily each year from 2011 (1.67 per 100,000) to 2015 (2.22 per 100,000). “We can’t afford to continue on this path. It is time for our state to prioritize women’s lives.”

# # #

The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence (LCADV) is a statewide network of programs, organizations, and individuals who share the goal of ending domestic violence in Louisiana. LCADV empowers its members and communities through advocacy, education, resource development, and technical assistance. LCADV is dedicated to bringing about change in our institutions, laws, politics, attitudes, and beliefs which will allow individuals to live free of violence. For more information, visit www.lcadv.org.

Download press release: VPC 2017 Press Release
See full report at http://www.vpc.org/studies/wmmw2017.pdf

Domestic Violence is Rooted in Oppression

Strengthening our Resolve in the Wake of Charlottesville

The Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence extends our sympathies to the families of those injured and killed in last weekend’s white supremacist gathering in Charlottesville, Virginia. We condemn their hatred and the culture of violence and oppression that it sustains. This type of hatred and bigotry emboldens those who use violence, coercion, intimidation, and domination to maintain power over others.

Last weekend’s events in Charlottesville made clear, yet again, the pressing need to dismantle systems of oppression that justify and promote violence. White supremacy is one of many such systems that play a central role in the continuation of gender based violence. We must acknowledge that all forms of oppression contribute to, and justify the existence of, domestic violence.

LCADV’s mission is to end domestic violence, and to do that we must not only acknowledge these systems of oppression, but actively work to end them. We encourage those who seek an end to domestic violence to recognize its roots in white supremacy, sexism, homophobia, and colonialism, and to take an active role in ending them. Only then will we create a society where all can live free of violence.