Use of Alternative Light Source (ALS) and Negative Filters to Improve the Visibility of Injuries Under the Skin

When:
September 25, 2013 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Where:
Webinar
Contact:
End Violence Against Women InternationalEvent website

A strangulation assault may leave no visible external injuries such as bruises or marks. Over 50-80% of strangulation victims do not present visible, external injuries.  While external signs and symptoms of strangulation may be difficult to detect to the naked eye, new technology is available to assist and detect underlying physical injuries incurred from a strangulation assault. This technology can also be applied to other areas of the body where bruises or injury may not be visible.

 

During this webinar, the presenters will discuss Alternative Light Source (ALS) technology and Negative Filter software programs used with digital camera systems and explore how they might be used in examining victims who have been strangled or beaten. ALS technology may be used to identify many types of evidence that would otherwise go undetected under standard lighting conditions or in daylight, such as semen, urine, blood, teeth marks, and fingerprints.

 

The presenters will also review research conducted to investigate how such technology has been used in cases involving strangulation and other forms of injury for increased identification, and discuss the potential outcomes and challenges associated with using this technology for evidence gathering purposes. Case examples will also be presented and resources provided, for current research using ALS for documentation of injury.

For more information and to register: https://www.evawintl.org/WebinarDetail.aspx?webinarid=3

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